the elements of a good old Safeguard commercial


Do you remember those days from 80’s and 90’s? Safeguard ads seemed to look all the same. Why? The reason is they maintained all the same elements in their commercials way back then. Let’s go back in time and see! :)

1. The konsensya. Literally meaning “conscience” in English, it is a shadow-like persona of the main character (the mother) that serves as her ego. The old Safeguard commercials wouldn’t be complete if there’s no presence of that “conscience”. An example of the konsensya‘s typical dialog is, “Ang germs na naiuwi mo, ipapasa mo ba sa kanya?” (“Will you let those germs pass over to your family?”) So, the conscience implies that she should use Safeguard in order to prevent spreading germs. And, the conscience also appears at the end of the commercial, saying that using Safeguard will make the family germ-free.

konsensya

2. Testimonial by a PAMET representative. Of course, this serves as the proof that Safeguard is guaranteed to make our bodies clean and germ-free as we use it.

pamet

3. Comparison of Safeguard to other brand of soap. This part of the ad shows that Safeguard is the best among the leading brands. Here, it shows that other leading brands cannot eliminate odor-causing germs like Safeguard does.  Too much emphasis, yeah. :)

safeguard-vs

4. An icon indicating that the person who used Safeguard is now protected and germ-free. Of course, this is the happy ending. The icons range from this…

safeguard-icon1

to this…

safeguard-icon2…to this!

safeguard-icon3

 

Safeguard commercials today

Those remarkable elements of Safeguard commercials are not always present in their ads today, especially on the past recent years, which we observed that the “konsensya” was not a part of Safeguard ads on that time. Today in 2014, as Safeguard promotes new products tied-up with other P&G brands such as Tide and Joy, the “konsensya” concept of a classic Safeguard ad is reviving again. :)

– Irish :)

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